December 21, 2017

3221 UNITED STATES (New York) - Wall Street

3221 New York City - Wall Street - New York Stock Exchange
and the statue of George Washington

Anchored by Wall Street, New York City has been called both the most economically powerful city and the leading financial center of the world, being home to the world's two largest stock exchanges by total market capitalization, the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. Wall Street, originally named by the Dutch founders de Waalstraat, is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

Slavery was introduced to Manhattan in 1626, but it was not until 1711 that the New York City Common Council made Wall Street the city's first official slave market for the sale and rental of enslaved Africans and Indians. In the late 18th century there was a buttonwood tree at the foot of Wall Street under which traders and speculators would gather to trade securities. In 1792, traders formalized their association with the  Buttonwood Agreement which was the origin of the New York Stock Exchange.

Across the street from the NYSL is Federal Hall, site of the first US Capitol Building where, in 1789, the Bill Of Rights was introduced by the first Congress and George Washington (statue see on the postcard) was inaugurated as the first American President. In the 1840s and 1850s most residents moved further uptown to Midtown Manhattan because of the increased business use at the lower tip of the island. Between 1860 and 1920, the economy changed from "agricultural to industrial to financial" and New York maintained its leadership position.

In 1884 Charles H. Dow began to track stock prices; his report evolved into The Wall Street Journal. The start of the 20th century period was the Wall Street's heyday. The address of 23 Wall Street, the headquarters of J. P. Morgan & Company, known as The Corner, was "the precise center, geographical as well as metaphorical, of financial America and even of the financial world". The stock market crash of 1929 ushered in the Great Depression.

During the New Deal years as well as the 1940s, there was much less focus on Wall Street and finance. The growing national economy and prosperity led to a recovery during the 1960s, with some down years during the early 1970s in the aftermath of the Vietnam War. In 1998, the NYSE and the city struck a $900 million deal which kept the NYSE from moving across the river to Jersey City; the deal was described as the "largest in city history to prevent a corporation from leaving town".

About the stamps
The first stamp is part of the series issued on November 5, 1970 for Christmas, Toys. The four 6-cent stamps were designed by Stevan Dohanos.
• locomotive
• toy horse
• tricycle
• doll carriage


The second and the third stamps are part of the series Christmas Carols, designed by Howard E. Paine & Steve McCracken, and issued on October 5, 2017, as Forever stamps. Familiar lines from each song highlight the individual stamps. The shades of blue in the backgrounds of the stamps evoke the evening scenes from the four carols.
• Jingle Bells
• Deck the Halls - It's on the postcard 3221
• Silent Night
• Jolly Old Saint Nicholas - It's on the postcard 3221


The last two stamps are part of the block of four 18-cent commemorative stamps featuring wildlife habitats, issued on June 26, 1981. The stamps of this series, named Preservation of Wildlife Habitats, were designed by Chuck Ripper of Huntington, West Virginia, and modeled by Peter Cocci. Each stamp depicts a different animal in its natural surroundings and focuses on a message to save each particular type of habitat - grassland, wetland, mountain, and woodland.
• Badger - Save Grassland Habitats
• Great Blue Heron - Save Wetland Habitats
• Grizzly Bear - Save Mountain Habitats - It's on the postcard 3221
• Ruffed Grouse - Save Woodland Habitats - It's on the postcard 3221

References
Wall Street - Wikipedia
New York Stock Exchange - Wikipedia

Sender: Denise 
Sent from Western Nassau (New York / United States), on 08.12.2017
Photo: Michael Bell

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